The rationale

The rationale

Postby Matt » Sat Nov 13, 2010 6:58 pm

Sotrusozer will not have a common religious practice because that would prohibit the majority of the human race from participating (the largest religion being able to claim less than a third of humanity as members). It is also because an almost universal feature of organized religions is the establishment of hierarchy through some measure of popularity or seniority, which would instigate conflict and tend to supplant with competition the desired-for cooperation. Seniority hierarchy also implies the existence of deserved privilege, which is directly contrary to the Sotrusozer goal of allowing every resident equal opportunity to identify and reach his or her potential.

Members may actively practice religion at the monastery, but not in any way that impacts the other members. Some examples:

    A Muslim climbing to the highest point of the monastery and singing out a call to prayer at the top of his lungs would impact the other members, and would not be tolerated. However, a Muslim laying a prayer mat out in a public but out-of-the-way place and quietly or silently praying would not impact other members and would be welcomed.
    A Christian ringing a 1000lb bell to announce the beginning of religious services would not be tolerated, but Christians gathering in a private chamber or public room reserved for the purpose would be welcomed.
    Wiccans gathering in a woodland area on the Monastery grounds to engage in worship would be welcomed, whereas Wiccans running through the halls of the monastery while singing praises to the Triple Goddess and Horned God would not.
Any thoughts on this principle? Can public worship, even if quietly performed, ever be non-intrusive to non-believers?
Matt
 
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Joined: Sat Nov 13, 2010 5:45 pm

Re: The rationale

Postby esseff » Sun Dec 25, 2011 7:18 pm

Matt wrote:Members may actively practice religion at the monastery, but not in any way that impacts the other members. Some examples:

    A Muslim climbing to the highest point of the monastery and singing out a call to prayer at the top of his lungs would impact the other members, and would not be tolerated. However, a Muslim laying a prayer mat out in a public but out-of-the-way place and quietly or silently praying would not impact other members and would be welcomed.
    A Christian ringing a 1000lb bell to announce the beginning of religious services would not be tolerated, but Christians gathering in a private chamber or public room reserved for the purpose would be welcomed.
    Wiccans gathering in a woodland area on the Monastery grounds to engage in worship would be welcomed, whereas Wiccans running through the halls of the monastery while singing praises to the Triple Goddess and Horned God would not.
Any thoughts on this principle? Can public worship, even if quietly performed, ever be non-intrusive to non-believers?


If you have too many rules when you start off, especially ones telling people what they can and cannot do, while it may seem like you ought to do it this way, people need to feel free to interpret what works for them. If it looks like something will become an issue, only then should you bring it up, on a case by case basis. If you make it clear from the outset that you're going to be interpreting what someone else feels is right for them, you may easily put off the very people who actually don't need to be told such things.
esseff
 
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Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2011 8:23 am

Re: The rationale

Postby Matt » Thu Dec 29, 2011 12:57 pm

esseff wrote:If you have too many rules when you start off, especially ones telling people what they can and cannot do, while it may seem like you ought to do it this way, people need to feel free to interpret what works for them. If it looks like something will become an issue, only then should you bring it up, on a case by case basis. If you make it clear from the outset that you're going to be interpreting what someone else feels is right for them, you may easily put off the very people who actually don't need to be told such things.


I see what you mean about putting off prospective members, and I wouldn't think of suggesting that we make rules of all those examples I gave. I was just trying to make clear what kinds of things I personally feel would be too much of an imposition on the other residents. Re-reading my post now, I think I already feel differently about a few of the things I mentioned. The annual celebrations, for instance, are surely something all residents could tolerate.

I have been reading about how successful communities are formed (most recently Diana Christian's Creating a Life Together), and the books are stressing the importance of putting down everyone's expectations in writing up front so that we don't end up with a bunch of guys coming together who are expecting different things from the community. I hope others who are interested in participating will post some of their preferences and expectations.

Matt
Matt
 
Posts: 39
Joined: Sat Nov 13, 2010 5:45 pm


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